Spirit: Repentance II (3)

    We may have flattered ourselves, as did Nicodemus, that our life has been upright, that our moral character is correct, and think that we need not humble the heart before God, like the common sinner: but when the light from Christ shines into our souls, we shall see how impure we are; we shall discern the selfishness of motive, the enmity against God, that has defiled every act of life. Then we shall know that our own righteousness is indeed as filthy rags, and that the blood of Christ alone can cleanse us from the defilement of sin, and renew our hearts in his own likeness.

One ray of the glory of God, one gleam of the purity of Christ, penetrating the soul, makes every spot of defilement painfully distinct, and lays bare the deformity and defects of the human character. It makes apparent the unhallowed desires, the infidelity of the heart, the impurity of the lips. The sinner's acts of disloyalty in making void the law of God, are exposed to his sight, and his spirit is stricken and afflicted under the searching influence of the Spirit of God. He loathes himself as he views the pure, spotless character of Christ.

When the prophet Daniel beheld the glory surrounding the heavenly messenger that was sent unto him, he was overwhelmed with a sense of his own weakness and imperfection. Describing the effect of the wonderful scene, he says, "There remained no strength in me; for my comeliness was turned in me into corruption, and I retained no strength." (Dan. 10:8). The soul thus touched will hate its selfishness, abhor its self-love, and will seek, through Christ's righteousness, for the purity of heart that is in harmony with the law of God and the character of Christ.

Paul says that as "touching the righteousness which is in the law,"--as far as outward acts were concerned,--he was "blameless;" (Phil. 3:6), but when the spiritual character of the law was discerned, he saw himself a sinner. Judged by the letter of the law as men apply it to the outward life, he had abstained from sin; but when he looked into the depths of its holy precepts and saw himself as God saw him, he bowed in humiliation, and confessed his guilt. He says, "I was alive without the law once; but when the commandment came, sin revived, and I died." (Rom. 7:9). When he saw the spiritual nature of the law, sin appeared in its true hideousness, and his self-esteem was gone.

God does not regard all sins as of equal magnitude; there are degrees of guilt in his estimation, as well as in that of man; but however trifling this or that wrong act may seem in the eyes of men, no sin is small in the sight of God. Man's judgment is partial, imperfect; but God estimates all things as they really are. The drunkard is despised, and is told that his sin will exclude him from heaven; while pride, selfishness, and covetousness too often go unrebuked. But these are sins that are especially offensive to God; for they are contrary to the benevolence of his character, to that unselfish love which is the very atmosphere of the unfallen universe. He who falls into some of the grosser sins may feel a sense of his shame and poverty and his need of the grace of Christ; but pride feels no need, and so it closes the heart against Christ, and the infinite blessings he came to give.

The poor publican who prayed, "God be merciful to me a sinner," (Luke 18:13), regarded himself as a very wicked man, and others looked upon him in the same light; but he felt his need, and with his burden of guilt and shame he came before God, asking for his mercy. His heart was open for the Spirit of God to do its gracious work, and set him free from the power of sin. The Pharisee's boastful, self-righteous prayer showed that his heart was closed against the influence of the Holy Spirit. Because of his distance from God, he had no sense of his own defilement, in contrast with the perfection of the divine holiness. He felt no need, and he received nothing.

If you see your sinfulness, do not wait to make yourself better. How many there are who think they are not good enough to come to Christ. Do you expect to become better through your own efforts? "Can the Ethiopian change his skin, or the leopard his spots? Then may ye also do good that are accustomed to do evil." (Jer. 13:23). There is help for us only in God. We must not wait for stronger persuasions, for better opportunities, or for holier tempers. We can do nothing of ourselves. We must come to Christ just as we are.

But let none deceive themselves with the thought that God, in his great love and mercy, will yet save even the rejecters of his grace. The exceeding sinfulness of sin can be estimated only in the light of the cross. When men urge that God is too good to cast off the sinner, let them look to Calvary. It was because there was no other way in which man could be saved, because without this sacrifice it was impossible for the human race to escape from the defiling power of sin, and be restored to communion with holy beings,--impossible for them again to become partakers of spiritual life,--it was because of this that Christ took upon himself the guilt of the disobedient, and suffered in the sinner's stead. The love and suffering and death of the Son of God, all testify to the terrible enormity of sin, and declare that there is no escape from its power, no hope of the higher life, but through the submission of the soul to Christ.

The impenitent sometimes excuse themselves by saying of professed Christians, "I am as good as they are. They are no more self-denying, sober, or circumspect in their conduct than I am. They love pleasure and self-indulgence as well as I do." Thus they make the faults of others an excuse for their own neglect of duty. But the sins and defects of others do not excuse any one; for the Lord has not given us an erring, human pattern. The spotless Son of God has been given as our example, and those who complain of the wrong course of professed Christians are the ones who should show better lives and nobler examples. If they have so high a conception of what a Christian should be, is not their own sin so much the greater? They know what is right, and yet refuse to do it. Beware of procrastination. Do not put off the work of forsaking your sins, and seeking purity of heart through Jesus. Here is where thousands upon thousands have erred, to their eternal loss.

(source: © Ellen G White; From "Steps To Christ")


Collated Spirit Articles

Growing Up Into Christ (1).

The plant, the child, grows by receiving from its surroundings that which ministers to its life, air, sunshine, and food...more

Growing Up Into Christ (2).

A life in Christ is a life of restfulness...more

Knowledge of God.

Many are the ways in which God is seeking to make himself known to us and to bring us into communion with him. Nature speaks to our senses without ceasing...more

Growing Up Into Christ (3).

Constantly beholding him, we "are changed into the same image from glory to glory, even as by the Spirit of the Lord." (II Cor. 3:18)...more

Growing Up Into Christ (4).

They knew that He was before the throne of God, their Friend and Saviour still...more

The Sinner's Need of Christ (1).

But after his sin, he could no longer find joy in holiness, and he sought to hide from the presence of God...more

The Sinner's Need of Christ (2).

But he added, in the bitterness of his soul-anguish and despair, "I am carnal, sold under sin...more

Repentance (1).

It is only through Christ that we can be brought into harmony with God, with holiness; but how are we to come to Christ?...more

Repentance (2).

Every desire for truth and purity, every conviction of our own sinfulness, is an evidence that his Spirit is moving upon our hearts...more

Repentance (3).

One ray of the glory of God, one gleam of the purity of Christ, penetrating the soul, makes every spot of defilement painfully distinct...more

Repentance (4).

Many accept an intellectual religion, a form of godliness, when the heart is not cleansed...more

The Privilege of Prayer (1).

Jesus himself, while he dwelt among men, was often in prayer. Our Saviour identified himself with our needs and weaknesses...more

The Work And The Life (1).

The spirit of Christ's self-sacrificing love is the spirit that pervades heaven...more

The Work And The Life (2).

We are brought into sympathy with Christ through the fellowship of his sufferings...more

The Work And The Life (3).

We need not go to heathen lands, or even leave the narrow circle of the home, if it is there that our duty lies, in order to work for Christ...more

Faith and Acceptance (1).

You have confessed your sins, and in heart put them away. You have resolved to give yourself to God...more

Faith and Acceptance (2).

Henceforth you are not your own; you are bought with a price...more

Faith and Acceptance (3).

But even this parable, tender and touching as it is, comes short of expressing the infinite compassion of the Heavenly Father...more

The Test of Discipleship (1).

Every burden is light; for the yoke that Christ imposes is easy. Duty becomes a delight, and sacrifice a pleasure...more

The Test of Discipleship (2).

When the principle of love is implanted in the heart, when man is renewed after the image of Him that created him, the new covenant promise is fulfilled...more

The Test of Discipleship (3).

If eternal life were granted on any condition short of this, then the happiness of the whole universe would be imperiled...more

The Test of Discipleship (4).

Even if we are overcome by the enemy, we are not cast off, not forsaken and rejected of God...more

Confession (1).

Confession will not be acceptable to God without sincere repentance and reformation. There must be decided changes in the life...more

Confession (2).

When sin has deadened the moral perceptions, the wrong-doer does not discern the defects of his character...more

What To Do With Doubt (1).

God never asks us to believe, without giving sufficient evidence upon which to base our faith...more

What To Do With Doubt (2).

There are many things apparently difficult or obscure, which God will make plain and simple to those who thus seek an understanding of them...more

Consecration (1).

"Ye shall seek me, and find me, when ye shall search for me with all your heart." (Jer. 29:13)...more